Jenn Welsch

 

Creative Director, Branding Specialist

1. What did or does starting look like for you?

Starting for me looks like getting over my inner demons and strongholds on beginning something new and simply taking the first step.

2. How did you know you needed to start?

Mostly when it feels like something that has bubbled up so much that it can't be contained. I've become better at recognizing the sensation and have a tendency to be proactive to those feelings now.

3. Looking back, what struggle are you most grateful for?

Spontaneity and saying "yes" when it meant the biggest risk, or didn't make the most sense.

4. What’s one resource you would share with someone who is wanting to start?

The Artist's Way- by Julia Cameron.

 

Joel Rekiel

 

Co-Founder of BLDGBLKS Music Company

1. What did or does starting look like for you?

It's a leap of faith, just believe that you can and you will. Starting something new is exciting, I've always been the type to take a risk or accept a challenge. If you fail the first time, you learn from your mistakes and try again. You're your own worst critic. It doesn't matter what other people think. They'll likely respect you more for making the attempt rather than making excuses.

2. How did you know you needed to start?

I knew I had to start because I wasn't happy where I was. I wanted something more. I didn't want to look back at my life and have regrets for not trying something new. No one can predict the future, it's up to you to determine where you want to be and go for it.

3. Looking back, what struggle are you most grateful for?

I'm most grateful for having to sleep on a couch for a year until I could afford to pay rent. Luckily, I have a great friend who was willing to let me crash on the couch while trying to start a new business. I had to stay up late and wake up early every day because I was on someone else's schedule. I'm also grateful for friends who were encouraging me to push forward and motivating me to keep going when things were hard. When you feel like you're at the lowest of lows every little step forward is a reward. Every challenge is a building block.

4. What’s one resource you would share with someone who is wanting to start?

Ask people for help. The worst someone will say is no, but if you just ask, people are generally willing to offer advice and tell you what they've learned along the way. Learn from your own and other's mistakes. I recently heard a great quote that really resonated with me, "Greatness does not mean what it is that you accomplish, it means what it is that you wake up every day and fight for." - Saul Blinkoff If you want something bad enough, you'll find a way to make it happen.

 

Missi Calvert

 

Stylist, Blogger, Photographer

1. What did or does starting look like for you?

Signing up for something that you can't back out of.

2. How did you know you needed to start?

When I saw myself becoming stagnant.

3. Looking back, what struggle are you most grateful for?

My processing disorder. It allowed me to be better with people since I wasn't able to learn from books.

4. What’s one resource you would share with someone who is wanting to start?

Well Balanced World Changer - by Sarah Cunningham

 

Chase Donald

 

Project Development

1. What did or does starting look like for you?

For me, starting isn't so much about looking at something you've been too timid or shy to tackle, but more so, transparently looking at yourself and allowing for a fully beautiful and magnificent event to transpire. It's an amazing feeling to look at yourself and wholly realize you do have the capability to accomplish whatever you want. That realization often times starts with me understanding that I really am not going into a new adventure alone. There are so many friends and family, who given the chance, want to support you! The first task of that transparent peek into yourself is allowing those you love, to actually love you and bring to the table their own God given gifts and resources.

Starting anything to me means having a nice inward look, because the closer you look at those walls you've built, the more you realize there is a specific person already in your life that has the frame of mind to help move beyond that wall, all the while teaching you something new. 

2. How did you know you needed to start?

I knew I needed to start because I knew that if I didn't, I'd burn myself out as I'd done in the past. There's not much worse for me than traveling between seasons only to know that once 10 years flies by, I'll have only grown in material wealth. I desire so much more than things. I crave longstanding, time tested, laughter filled, experiences. I want to be able to give others hope and joy, and I personally don't believe I would be able to do that winding through life, one flame out to the next. 

3. Looking back, what struggle are you most grateful for?

In college I was forced to take a year off for financial reasons. I went back home to Chicago to get a couple jobs, work my butt off, and return to school in Colorado. That whole year though, between being a truck driver during the day and a bar-back at night, I worked 70-75 hours a week for 14 months. There was very little sleep, but there was a lot of time spent with my parents. Coming back to Colorado after that year, all I could make of that year was that it was extremely difficult and tiresome, but now I realize I was still too close to that year to see its benefit.

A mere 7 months after returning to Colorado, my dad was diagnosed with Stage 4 Lung Cancer. Terminal. He passed away 10 months after his diagnosis. That year off may have been a struggle, but it allowed for so much laughter, fun, family, and just time well spent with my dad. Having that year off with my parents really did teach me a lot, and what he passed on to me is still ingrained in me. His tenacity is what allows me to continually pursue life to the best of my ability. 

4. What’s one resource you would share with someone who is wanting to start?

Failing and being completely ok with it. Just because you fail does not mean what you're pursuing is over. Life is a constant process of refinement and if you don't allow yourself to fail, you won't allow yourself an honest START. Allowing yourself to fail continually builds your foundation and refines the vision as you move up. Look at the pyramids! They would crumble under the weight and pressure of everything if built upside down. With the solid foundation at the bottom though, it allows the pyramid to taper upwards, all moving to the pinnacle at the top. Allowing yourself to fail lets you refine the vision upwards, giving the understanding that there is enough experience "below" you to look up and realize you're making progress. 

 

Katie Gerber

 

Project Development, Holistic Living & Nutrition Coach

1. What did or does starting look like for you?

For me, starting is taking the first step (no matter how small) towards my goal. I may not know how or even if I’m going to get to the final destination, but I can always identify the one next step. If I break the goal down to manageable pieces, it’s no longer overwhelming. When I thru-hiked the Pacific Crest Trail, for example, I rarely thought about the fact that I was trying to hike to Canada (2,660 miles from where I started at the US/Mexico border). I thought about how I was going to hike to my next resupply point 100 miles away or even how I just needed to hike to wherever I wanted to camp that night. I had to keep reminding myself that just those 10-20 miles would be progress towards my goal.

2. How did you know you needed to start?

Starting is fueled by inspiration, but it’s rooted in discomfort. Whenever I’ve been stagnant for too long or find myself no longer living in alignment with my values, the need to start becomes apparent. It’s an itch that gets so intense that you must scratch it.

For me, starting happens when the discomfort of not doing something outweighs all my fears and reasons for putting it off… in other words, the pain of not doing the thing becomes greater than the anticipated pain of doing it.

3. Looking back, what struggle are you most grateful for?

I wouldn’t call this a struggle per se, but I’m grateful that I had parents that expected a lot out of me. It taught me to expect a lot out of myself and that helped me to push past my perceived limits. I developed discipline and I learned how to find joy in hard work and comfort in the discomfort.

4. What’s one resource you would share with someone who is wanting to start?

I would say that when you’re starting anything, developing a resilient mindset is invaluable. When you want to create anything, whether it’s art or a business or a life worth living, you must know that failure at certain points is inevitable, and it’s ok, and you must have the courage to start anyways.

 

Andrea Lynne Watkins

 

Content Creation & Management
Founding Partner of Emotion Swells

1. What did or does starting look like for you?

It looks powerful.

2. How did you know you needed to start?

There was this moment when all of a sudden I gave myself permission to connect to this deep longing in my soul and I got this glimpse of who I really am.  And I wanted her.  I knew in order to love myself I needed to start.  

This quote from Michael Meade sums it up for me: “Our longings tell us that there is another half, a better half, a fuller life somewhere. We enter life full of longing; we are born to it, born of it. Each life is wrapped around longings set inside dreams wound into the fabric of our souls. We die for a lack of knowing how big our longing truly is, and we die from allowing our true longings to be diminished by the banality of life and the ways in which we continue to abandon ourselves. The problem is not that we long for something; the problem is that so much of our genuine longing for life can become lost in the fog of memories or the haze of confusion and speed of changes that now characterize the human village.” 

3. Looking back, what struggle are you most grateful for?

There are so many! And I am truly grateful for them all. But the one that cracked me open and revealed my path was my dad having a brain aneurysm rupture and having the opportunity to care for him in his most vulnerable moments. He died last November and I am so grateful for the pain because it taught me that anything that is worth anything is worth going through pain and discomfort to achieve it.

4. What’s one resource you would share with someone who is wanting to start?

Your emotions are the most powerful resource we have access to. Each emotion arises for specific reasons, and each of them brings gifts, benefits, and skills that we can’t get anywhere else. When we know why our emotions arise and how to work with them, we have the opportunity to understand ourselves and others better, and we’re able to access the intelligence and gifts our emotions bring us. 

Click here to download The Intelligence Inside Your Emotions, a short PDF resource to help you understand the genius that lives inside you.